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Cumulative confirmed cases of COVID-19 by date confirmed

Case no. 1: Severe arthritis

T o give you some idea of what can be achieved, here are some case histories from my clinical notebooks. These are not even the most sensational recoveries I know of. The ones included here are typical of a wide variety of conditions and are chosen because they show ordinary people with ordinary, though in some cases severe, diseases – the kind you might be suffering from. These are not medical reports of the kind that I would supply to a fellow medical practitioner, just plain stories, told in everyday English that illustrate the point. The scientific and technical basis of these recoveries is fully covered later in the book. Each case was put through the diet wise plan and the results are summarized. Long before the final chapter you should be able to achieve the same success for yourself.

Mac was a friendly 50-year-old Scot, lively, intelligent and well educated – everything the émigré from north of the border of Britain is traditionally noted for. He was hard-working and successful too, one of the army of quiet businessmen of the type who once helped Britain builds and maintains her empire across the globe. At the peak of his career he was senior executive in a Far Eastern company, traveling the world and enjoying the respect of colleagues from Manchester to Tokyo. He had earned his status and was entitled to be proud of it.

Things drifted for a while. Various doctors treated him, but this amounted to no more than painkillers, which did little to help and made no impact on the progress of the disease. Inevitably, it became impossible for him to do his job, energy consuming and demanding as it was. The final straw came in Japan – a heart attack which was followed by angina: pain due to cardiac under-perfusion brought on by exercise. Mac was pensioned off, so to speak, on health grounds and sent home to this country. There he was given work that was much easier, but it was very unfulfilling for someone like him. He felt as if he had been relegated to the back row, and it cast a long, deep shadow on all his achievements and his career as a whole.

Case no. 2: Mysterious swellings

Mrs. G was a 47-year-old married social worker. Apart from being a little highly strung, she had enjoyed good health for most of her adult life. She had raised three fine children and was approaching the time of life when she and her husband would be entitled to start looking forward to enjoying the fruits of their labors.

The dream of a comfortable middle age was, however, rudely shattered by sudden ill health: not cancer, high blood pressure, a coronary or any of the well-known sinister and dangerous conditions, yet to her it was frightening and debilitating and it had a hardly less damaging effect on her well being than possible more serious complaints might have done. About four years before she came to see me, sudden mysterious swellings had started to develop. These were not continually present but came in attacks that occurred every few weeks right out of the blue.

My first question was “When did it start?” She remembered the occasion clearly. It was in a traffic jam; she had been driving her car and had, like most of the other drivers, become steadily more frustrated and overwrought mentally. The fumes had been choking, and the heat (it was a summer’s day) had made her feel faint and weary. When the traffic eventually got on the move again she had found herself in tears: perhaps it was due to stress, or to the fact that her eyes felt red and itchy – she wasn’t sure. But by the time she got home and looked in the mirror the truth was obvious: some strange and frightening reaction had caused her face to puff up and her eyes to turn bloodshot and sore. After that the problem recurred with increasing frequency. It would be tempting to assume an allergy to traffic fumes, but it is worth noting that she was exposed on a very large number of occasions to equally high concentrations and had no reaction. Furthermore, she would sometimes get this swelling without even going out of doors. Inconsistencies like this are fully explained in this book.

Case no. 3: Behavioral problems

The next case is that of a schoolboy which is so like the story of hundreds and thousands of others that I think it a great shame that all teachers, as well as parents, are unaware of the importance of diet in influencing behavior. Luckily this tale has a happy ending, but so many do not: often delinquency, even crime, follows in the wake of poor eating, and the helpless teachers and mystified parents never suspect the real reason. Such a pity, when the cure is so easy, as this book shows.

I have allowed the lad’s mother to tell the story in the form of a letter to me:

Dear Dr. Scott-Mummy, It’s marvelous to be able to write and tell you what a complete success your dietary program has been with our son Alan. As you know, we had some awful problems, but now, thanks to you, he is the lovely boy he promised to be as a toddler. Let me go back to the beginning. A little baby was always so happy and a delight to be with. In fact we had no inkling of what was to follow. It wasn’t until he reached the age of about three, when he started to go to preschool that things began to go wrong.

Case no. 4: Eczema

This case concerns Mr. Elegy, a 41-year-old man with severe eczema, an unpleasant peeling, weeping and cracking condition of the skin. His face was like a mask, and the eczema extended all over his body, worse in some parts than others. He was an architect, and meeting clients caused him intense embarrassment, so much so that he felt like apologizing for himself. At its worst the rash was so bad that he had to be wrapped in bandages soaked in cold water to overcome the intense irritation. It had first started about four years before he came to me, and within the first twelve months he had been in trouble: he had then needed to be kept in the hospital for three weeks on steroid medication.

These drugs appear wonderful at producing a rapid cure, but there is always a sting in the tail: once you start them you can’t easily stop them, or the condition will flare up again. You see, they never cure, only mask symptoms. That’s exactly what happened to Mr. Elegy. Three weeks after he was sent home, the rash was worse than ever. He did not succeed in abandoning the steroid creams altogether, but managed to cope with his condition, very wretchedly, for over three more years.

Case no. 5: Bowel disorder

The next patient is Maria, an attractive 24-year-old Londoner of Cypriot extraction. She came to see me with abdominal distress, flatulence, bloating and variability of bowel function. Sometimes she would be constipated for days on end; at others she had diarrhea so severely that she would be caught out and have to run immediately to the nearest toilet. The complaint had troubled her for as long as she could remember; furthermore, her father, his father, an aunt and a young cousin were affected in exactly the same way.

Last word

Then a double tragedy struck: his grandfather, to whom he was very close, died suddenly, and within a very short interval a close friend committed suicide. People die all the time; of course, with varying degrees of impact on those they leave behind; but for an adolescent boy facing the stress of preparation for major examinations it proved rather a lot to cope with. Toni’s mood changed, and he began to suffer long bouts of gloom. At times he became so indolent with despondency that it quite worried his parents. They sought medical advice, with the result that at the incredibly early age of fourteen he was put on antidepressant drugs. These are a disaster at any age, in my opinion, but to prescribe them for a newly forming adult personality was an unforgivable blunder.

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